Our Team

Home / Our Team
Carolyn Sufrin

Carolyn Sufrin, MD, PhD

Carolyn Sufrin (she/her) is an Ob/Gyn and medical anthropologist. She has worked extensively on reproductive health issues affecting incarcerated women, from providing clinical care in jail, to research, policy advising, and advocacy. Her work is situated at the intersection of reproductive justice, health care, and mass incarceration, which she examines in her book, Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women Behind Bars (University of California Press, 2017). She is frequently interviewed by outlets, and has appeared on NPR, The Economist, The Washington Post, and the New York Times. Dr. Sufrin serves on the board of directors of the National Commission on Correctional Health care as the liaison for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, where she is also a member (ex-officio) of the Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women.  For more information, please visit Dr. Sufrin’s profile on Johns Hopkins Medicine, and check out this article in the Johns Hopkins magazine to learn more about her path to this work.

Camille Kramer headshot

Camille Kramer, MPH

Camille Kramer (she/her) is a public health professional and the Senior Research Program Coordinator for ARRWIP. Her role is to coordinate and assist with all aspects of study implementation and design for the grant-funded projects including study design, participant recruitment, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript writing. Prior to joining ARRWIP, Camille worked at a child advocacy center in Atlanta, GA where her work focused on the commercial sexual exploitation of children. She has a master’s of public health in Health Promotion and Behavior and her public health interests include health disparities, sexual and reproductive health, social determinants of health, and implementation science research.

Denae Bradley

Denae Bradley, MA

Denae Bradley (she/her) is a PhD student (ABD) in the Department of Sociology and Criminology at Howard University, USA. She is also a Health Policy Research Scholar (HPRS), a national leadership program supported by the Roberts-Wood Johnson Foundation. Her research is guided by Black Feminist perspectives and informed by a Reproductive Justice praxis. Her research interests lie at the intersection of sexual and reproductive health, maternal and infant health, and mass incarceration. She is especially interested in how processes  (i.e., maternal substance use and risk of incarceration) and practices (i.e., shackling pregnant people) within the carceral state influence maternal and reproductive health experiences, particularly for Black women and birthing people. Over the course of her graduate career, she has worked extensively to research the impact of psychosocial factors and racism on health outcomes and the effects of policing and COVID-19 on the Black community. She previously worked in community development in the Mississippi Delta.

crystal hayes

Crystal Hayes, PhD, MSW

Crystal Hayes (she/her) is a Black feminist social work and reproductive justice scholar. Her dissertation research focused on the pregnancy and childbirth experiences of incarcerated Black women as a reproductive justice and Black feminist issue. She comes to this work with extensive experience working as an advocate and prison-based doula with over 10 years as a social work educator. As a system impacted person—she cut her first teeth behind prison walls as the child of an incarcerated parent—Crystal is deeply committed to an anti-carceral and anti-racist approaches to incarcerated pregnant people’s health. She is currently a Postdoctoral Trainee at the Center of Excellence, at the Gillings School of Global Public Health in the Maternal and Child Health Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). Her work at the intersections of reproductive justice, race, and prison abolition offers a unique perspective to debates about maternal and perinatal health for pregnant people in prison.

Research Interns

Lauren Brunet

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health ‘22

Caitlin Hendricks

Caitlin Hendricks

Johns Hopkins University, ‘21

Lynn Kao

Lynn Kao

Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine ‘24

Chanel Lee

Chanel Lee

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health ‘22

Trisha Parayil

Johns Hopkins University, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences ‘21

Ankita Patil

Ankita Patil 

The College of New Jersey ‘23

Karissa

Karissa Rajagopal

University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine  ‘22

Vivian Su

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health ‘22

Karenna Thomas

Karenna Thomas

Yale University  ‘23